Pentecost 

This poem was inspired by a photograph on display at the Museum of Modern Art in Deland Florida. The photo was taken by Stephen Althouse, 2017. The title of the photo is “Door with Flames.” The photo by itself is mesmerizing. I imagined it on the house of a character from a Tolkein novel. What really caught my attention was how Althouse digitally imposed a script on the door which I use in the poem. Those words are not mine but they inspired me so I used them. I was immediately captivated by the image of the door, the flames, the words and the possibilities of all of them. 
Pentecost

They remembered he had spoken of what was to come and since everything else he had come to pass they had no reason to doubt him. 

After all they had seen, his bloody death, his appearances, they remained afraid and were now locked behind the door, locked and uninviting. 

(The door with flames carved into it) 

He had already appeared among them and most of them believed even if they had not seen for themselves, still afraid they were greatly overjoyed to see him and they begged him to.stay, he left again but they knew he was alive, really alive. 

Peter had spoken of fire, tongues of fire and of wind, even though the door was shut up tight. 

(As if they were called to open the door and to reenter the world after all the terrible things they had seen.)

Then they spoke in other tongues  – “temo les seves flames pero les meves prequentes em demanem que l’orbi…”

 Then they opened the door despite their fear – they believed it is what he wanted them to do.

T.S. Deary 

2/16/2020

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