The bear was standing at the end of the driveway, huge, black, slow moving, oblivious to anyone and everything around him.

He had an abundance of confidence and the full realistion that no one would get in his way. 

He looked at us from where he was and then slowly turned around and wandered to the woods across the street, ready for a nap and once rested he will raom.around again.tipping trash cans and aggravating dogs who respond to their presence by barking through windoes and disturbing tranquil mornings. 

(By late August their instincts  are primed, imperceptible to others, but to the head these days are already getting shorter.)

These visits will become more frequent and more urgent. 

When the winter comes and he will.sleep much more than now. …

(though not the deep.sleep of hibernation – the.sleep will come.)

Then there was the bear we saw in New Hampshire,

then in full summer, his noise, was the only noise that disturbed those tranquil mountains.

(king of the mountain – only a bigger bear could get in his way.) 

That bear also felt those internal instincts – although much sooner than that southern near.

In a few months he will feel the tug of instinct pulling him.to his den to sleep until spring – then to.return to those mountains to start all over again.) 

Instincts,

for the bear to sleep,

for the dog to bark,

for us to respect his strength,

to protect curious children,

and to preserve the tranquility of a late August morning.
T.S. Deary

8/27/2020